Cadence Publishes Book on Mixed-Signal Methodology

The growing complexity of today’s mixed-signal designs requires major changes in design methodology to both increase productivity and deliver high quality products on time. This wide-ranging compendium examines in depth such topics as AMS behavioral modeling, mixed-signal metric-driven verification, concurrent mixed-signal physical implementation, analog scaling at advanced nodes, IC package integration and data management for mixed-signal designs.

Cadence Design Systems, Inc. has published a book on design methodology for chip designers and CAD engineers that focuses on current and future advanced mixed-signal design challenges and solutions. The "Mixed-Signal Methodology Guide" provides an overview of the design, verification and implementation methodologies required for advanced mixed-signal designs. The book brings together top mixed-signal design experts from across the industry -- including authors from Boeing, Cadence, ClioSoft and Qualcomm -- to address the complex problems facing the mixed-signal design community.

The volume is intended for design teams looking for improvements in their mixed-signal design flows. For managers, it provides an overview of modern mixed-signal methodologies to make it easier to understand and plan for investment in design capabilities and skills. The guide also helps analog and digital designers value the domains and disciplines of one another and learn about more efficient ways to collaborate, which is critical for the overall success of mixed-signal projects.

The 408 page "Mixed-Signal Methodology Guide," featuring a foreword by industry pioneer Alberto Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, is available now at www.Lulu.com and will be available soon at Amazon.com. For more details about the book and ordering information- go to: www.cadence.com/msmguide.

Although books are valuable reference tools the fast pace of development in area as dynamic as mixed-signal design, make it necessary to provide updates. it is fine for experts to look into the future and anticipate needs, that is what engineering is about, but an unforeseen breakthrough could change things significantly.